Teen Nutrition Facts

Teen Nutrition Facts

Total Facts Obesity Facts • In California, 39.6% of children are unfit and 26.5% are overweight. Source: 2001 California Physical Fitness Test obtained from the California Department of Education.• 15.5 percent of children were seriously overweight and 15 percent more were at risk of becoming so. That was triple the rate of 20 years earlier.Source: 2002 data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. • 64 percent of adults overweight or obese in 2000, compared with 56 percent six years earlier. Source: 2002 data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey • Teens overall: 30.4 percent of teens are overweight and 15.5 percent are obese. This rate has quadrupled over 25 years (About 15% of teens are obese today, compared to just 5% in the 1960s.)Source: 2002 data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey • Increase in Obesity Prevalence (%) Among U.S. Children (Ages 6 to 11) 1971 to 1974 1988 to 1994 1999 to 2000 Boys + 4.3% + 11.6% + 16% Girls + 3.6% + 11% + 14.5% Source: CDC, National Center for Health Statistics, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Ogden et. al. JAMA. 2002;288:1728-1732. • It is estimated that 65 percent of adult Americans are overweight and 30 percent are obese. Source: Centers for Disease Control/CDC - Overweight and Obesity http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpa/obesity/ • The latest data from the National Center for Health Statistics show that 30 percent of U.S. adults 20 years of age and older—over 60 million people—are obese. Source: Centers for Disease Control/CDC - Overweight and Obesity http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpa/obesity/ • The percentage of young people who are overweight has more than tripled since 1980. Among children and teens aged 6–19 years, 16 percent (over 9 million young people) are considered overweight.Source: Centers for Disease Control/CDC - Overweight and Obesity http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpa/obesity/ • Increased consumption of more energy-dense, nutrient-poor foods with high levels of sugar and saturated fats, combined with reduced physical activity, have led to obesity rates that have risen three-fold or more since 1980 in some areas of North America, the United Kingdom, Eastern Europe, the Middle East, the Pacific Islands, Australasia and China. The obesity epidemic is not restricted to industrialized societies; this increase is often faster in developing countries than in the developed world. Source: World Health Organization, United Nations Obesity & overweight http://www.who.int/dietphysicalactivity/publications/facts/obesity/en/ see also Obesity & Overweight – Fact Sheet – WHO, 2003 http://www.who.int/dietphysicalactivity/media/en/gsfs_obesity.pdf • The most immediate consequence of overweight as perceived by the children themselves is social discrimination. This is associated with poor self-esteem and depression.Source: The Surgeon General''s Call To Action To Prevent and Decrease Overweight and Obesity, December 2001 http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/topics/obesity/calltoaction/fact_adolescents.htm Nutrition Facts • Teenage boys who are active require about 2800 calories.www.keepkidshealthy.com/ adolescent/adolescentnutrition.html • Teenage girls who are active require about 2200 calories.www.keepkidshealthy.com/ adolescent/adolescentnutrition.html • The U.S. government recommends restricting fat intake to 30 percent or less of calorie intake.http://www.fda.gov/fdac/features/795_teenfood.html • Adolescents consume about 38 percent of their total calories from fat, 15 percent of their calories from saturated fat and over 300 mg of cholesterol per day. In contrast, most U.S. health authorities recommend anyone over the age of two consume 30 percent of calories from fat, 10 percent of calories from saturated fat and up to 300 mg of cholesterol each day.http://www.kidsource.com/kidsource/content3/ific/ific.teen.trends.html#Nutrient • The “%DV” on the Nutrition Facts food labels is a number that tells you if there’s a lot or a little of a nutrient in a serving of food. 5%DV or less of a nutrient in a serving is low; 20%DV or more is high.http://www.teengrowth.com/index.cfm?action=info_article&ID_article=1384 see also http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/002459.htm#Definition http://www.nutritiondata.com/glossary.html • Children and youth consume a large proportion of their total calories from foods and beverages that are of high-caloric and low-nutrient content.Source: Food Marketing to Children and Youth: Threat or Opportunity? National Academies Press, 2006 http://darwin.nap.edu/books/0309097134/html • Asked what their child ate the day before, the parents reported an average of just three servings of fruits or vegetables, when dietitians recommend at least five.Source: The San Jose Mercury News and the Kaiser Family Foundation Survey on Childhood Obesity – March 2004 http://www.kff.org/kaiserpolls/obesity.cfm • One in five parents reported their child had eaten no fruit. One in eight said no vegetable.Source: The San Jose Mercury News and the Kaiser Family Foundation Survey on Childhood Obesity – March 2004 http://www.kff.org/kaiserpolls/obesity.cfm • Children become much less likely to eat breakfast as they move on to high school, parents reported, and 40 percent said their children had eaten fast food the day before.Source: The San Jose Mercury News and the Kaiser Family Foundation Survey on Childhood Obesity – March 2004 http://www.kff.org/kaiserpolls/obesity.cfm • Asked about eating habits, the 292 parents of school-age children among the 1,175 adults surveyed offered evidence of how good nutrition and exercise can take a back seat to the demands of school and the hectic schedules of families.Source: The San Jose Mercury News and the Kaiser Family Foundation Survey on Childhood Obesity – March 2004 http://www.kff.org/kaiserpolls/obesity.cfm • The nation created the National School Lunch Program to provide a response to hunger, now, this same anti-hunger infrastructure is playing a crucial role in addressing the obesity epidemic.Source: Improving Meal Quality in School Meals California Food Policy Advocates – 2003 http://www.cfpa.net/ • California schools participating in the National School Lunch program are required by federal law to adopt and implement a district-wide Wellness Policy by the beginning of the 2006-07 school year that includes student input. The California Department of Education and the California School Boards Association sent a letter to Superintendents and School Boards reminding them of their responsibility in May of 2005.http://www.csba.org/csn/may05/cde_csba.pdf • Research shows that kids who eat school breakfast consume more fruits, vegetables and calcium and less sugar than kids who don’t participate. School breakfasts also include more fruits and vegetables than other sources of breakfast—including breakfast prepared by parents.Source California Food Policy Advocates http://www.breakfastfirst.org • The 2005 County Nutrition Profile report calculates the missed opportunities of low nutrition program participation and ranks California counties according to their performance on key hunger, obesity and health indicators. In addition, the report has a section on school breakfast access and participation in each county.Source: California Food Policy Advocates – 2005 http://www.cfpa.net/ Disease Facts • Asthma: Prevalence of overweight is reported to be significantly higher in children and adolescents with moderate to severe asthma compared to a peer group. Source: The Surgeon General''s Call To Action To Prevent and Decrease Overweight and Obesity, December 2001 http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/topics/obesity/calltoaction/fact_adolescents.htm • Type 2 diabetes: The rise of obesity in adolescents is the most significant factor for the rise in Type 2 diabetes. (Type 2 accounted for 2 to 4 percent of all childhood diabetes before 1992, but skyrocketed to 16 percent by 1994.)Source: The Surgeon General''s Call To Action To Prevent and Decrease Overweight and Obesity, December 2001 http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/topics/obesity/calltoaction/fact_adolescents.htm • Adolescent females, who develop a negative body image, are at a greater risk for the subsequent development of eating disorders.Source: The Surgeon General''s Call To Action To Prevent and Decrease Overweight and Obesity, December 2001http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/topics/obesity/calltoaction/fact_adolescents.htm • Obesity is catching up to tobacco as the leading cause of death in America. If this trend continues, it will soon overtake tobacco.'' The CDC estimates that 400,000 deaths were related to overeating and physical inactivity in 2000. Smoking remained the leading cause of death and accounted for some 435,000 deaths. The CDC estimates that at least 30 percent of all Americans are obese. In 1990, the third-leading cause of preventable death, alcohol, was responsible for 100,000 deaths. By 2000, that number had dropped to 85,000.Source: Government pleads with Americans to change habits. Mercury News Wire Services - March 10, 2004 • According to the National Institutes of Health, people who are obese (more than 20 percent above their ideal weight) are more likely to have hypertension, increased stress, high blood cholesterol levels, diabetes and some kinds of cancer. Source: National Institutes of Health • Risk factors for heart disease, such as high cholesterol and high blood pressure, occur with increased frequency in overweight children and adolescents compared to children with a healthy weight.Source: The Surgeon General''s Call To Action To Prevent and Decrease Overweight and Obesity, December 2001 http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/topics/obesity/calltoaction/fact_adolescents.htm • Overweight adolescents have a 70% chance of becoming overweight or obese adults. This increases to 80% if one or more parent is overweight or obese. Overweight or obese adults are at risk for a number of health problems including heart disease, type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, and some forms of cancer.Source: The Surgeon General''s Call To Action To Prevent and Decrease Overweight and Obesity, December 2001 http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/topics/obesity/calltoaction/fact_adolescents.htm • Eating disorders are extreme expressions of a range of weight and food issues. Some symptoms are food obsession, eating large amounts of food, intentional vomiting after meals and self-starvation in order to lose weight or maintain normal weight. Food is not the primary problem, but a symptom of a serious emotional problem that results in loss of self-control, obsession, anxiety, guilt and depression. Source: Disordered Eating Facts – California ProjectLEAN http://www.californiaprojectlean.org/ Health & Fitness Facts • It’s estimated that forty-three percent of adolescents watch more than two hours of television each day. Source: Media in the Home National Survey - June 26, 2000 Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania Kids & Media @ The New Millennium, Kaiser Family Foundation – November 1999 see also http://www.tvturnoff.org/images/facts&figs/factsheets/FactsFigs.pdf http://www.secondaryenglish.com/mediumismaster.htm • Most teens watch about 19 hours of TV per week and see up to 20,000 commercials per year. Source: Girls Life – April, 2001 http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0IBX/is_5_7/ai_72765237 • A 2003 Harvard Medical School study indicated that the more TV teens watched the fewer fruits, and vegetables they ate. Source: Health on the Net Foundation – December 2003 http://www.hon.ch/News/HSN/516372.html • Excessive TV viewing has been linked to obesity. Source: American Academy of Pediatrics Policy Statement, Feb. 2001 http://aappolicy.aappublications.org/cgi/content/full/pediatrics%3b107/2/423 • Recent studies indicate that the amount of TV a child watches can predict whether he or she will become obese or overweight. Sources: Various sources in New Zealand, Australia & Great Britain http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/healthnews.php?newsid=30587 http://www.mja.com.au/public/issues/184_02_160106/sal10430_fm.html http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/medicalnews.php?newsid=32330 • Children, especially girls, become less active as they move through adolescence. Source: CDC, National Center for Health Statistics, National Health and Nutrition “teen” = ages 12 to 19; Every adolescent above the 85th percentile as "overweight." • Many parents also reported that their children spend considerable time watching television or sitting at a computer. Source: The San Jose Mercury News and the Kaiser Family Foundation Survey on Childhood Obesity – March 2004 http://www.kff.org/kaiserpolls/obesity.cfm • While three out of four said their child participates in an organized sport, just over one in three walk to school or ride their bike. (The more affluent the parent, the less likely the child is to walk.) Source: The San Jose Mercury News and the Kaiser Family Foundation Survey on Childhood Obesity – March 2004 http://www.kff.org/kaiserpolls/obesity.cfm • Three out of four parents said their child watches at least an hour of TV a day, more than half said their child spends at least an hour on the computer, and 25 percent said video games take up an hour or more. Source: The San Jose Mercury News and the Kaiser Family Foundation Survey on Childhood Obesity – March 2004 http://www.kff.org/kaiserpolls/obesity.cfm • At the same time, 89 percent of parents said lack of regular exercise was a major reason children were overweight, compared with 52 percent who said too much unhealthy fast food and packaged food was a major reason. Source: The San Jose Mercury News and the Kaiser Family Foundation Survey on Childhood Obesity – March 2004 http://www.kff.org/kaiserpolls/obesity.cfm • Schools have cut back physical education classes, and children don''t play outside as much as they used to, they agree. Fast food is available in school lunch lines. Food makers have increased the size of portions. Children are drinking more soda. Source: The San Jose Mercury News and the Kaiser Family Foundation Survey on Childhood Obesity – March 2004 http://www.kff.org/kaiserpolls/obesity.cfm Food Marketing Facts • Annual sales of foods and beverages to young consumers exceeded $27 billion in 2002. Food and beverage advertisers collectively spend $10 billion to $12 billion a year to reach children and youth. Source: Advertising, Marketing and the Media: Improving Messages Institute of Medicine of the National Academies - September 2004 www.iom.edu/File.aspx?ID=22609 • Over the past 10 years, US children and adolescents have increasingly been targeted with intensive and aggressive forms of food marketing and advertising practices through a range of channels. Source: Food Advertising and Marketing Directed at Children and Adolescents in the U.S. By Mary Story and Simone French, Division of Epidemiology, University of Minnesota http://www.ijbnpa.org/content/1/1/3 • With poor diet and physical inactivity poised to become the leading preventable cause of death in America, HHS Secretary Tommy G. Thompson renewed efforts against obesity and overweight, announcing a new national education campaign and a new research strategy at HHS'' National Institutes of Health (NIH). Source: Department of Health & Human Services – March 2004 http://www.hhs.gov/news/press/2004pres/20040312.html see also http://www.adcouncil.org/campaigns/healthy_lifestyles/ http://www.smallstep.gov/ • Branding has become a normalized part of life for American children and adolescents as marketers seek to develop positive and sustained brand relationships with young consumers and their parents in order to create brand recognition and foster brand loyalty, brand advantage, and brand equity. Source: Food Marketing to Children and Youth: Threat or Opportunity? National Academies Press, 2006 http://darwin.nap.edu/books/0309097134/html • Most middle and high schools have at least one soda machine. Some have more than a dozen. Five Santa Clara County school districts have exclusive contracts with Pepsi that add up to millions of dollars for them. Schools have come to depend on revenue from the machines to finance everything from sports programs to after-school activities. The San Jose Unified School District pulls in more than $300,000 a year from its Pepsi machines. Source: The San Jose Mercury News and the Kaiser Family Foundation Survey on Childhood Obesity – March 2004 http://www.kff.org/kaiserpolls/obesity.cfm • Two out of three San Francisco Bay Area adults think soda machines should not be allowed in schools, the Mercury News/Kaiser Family Foundation Survey on Childhood Obesity found, and 56 percent would still oppose them even if a school could earn $20,000 a year from them. 66 percent said their schools had them -- and of those, 64 percent said their children used the machines. Source: The San Jose Mercury News and the Kaiser Family Foundation Survey on Childhood Obesity – March 2004 http://www.kff.org/kaiserpolls/obesity.cfm • Beginning July 1, 2004, a new California law prohibited selling sugary drinks at elementary and middle schools during school hours.Source: Soda machines: critics take aim at most visible symbol of problem. San Jose Mercury News - March 09, 2004 http://www.kff.org/kaiserpolls/obesity.cfm • Los Angeles Unified -- the second largest school district -- removed sugary drinks from all 137 middle and high school campuses in January of 2004.Source: Soda machines: critics take aim at most visible symbol of problem. San Jose Mercury News - March 09, 2004 http://www.kff.org/kaiserpolls/obesity.cfm Diet Facts • Approximately 69 percent of Americans are trying to either lose or control their weight. Source: Centers for Disease Control/CDC - Overweight and Obesity http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpa/obesity/ • Diets rich in fruits and vegetables may reduce the risk of cancer and other chronic diseases. Source: Centers for Disease Control/CDC - Overweight and Obesity http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpa/5aday/ • Obese youngsters should avoid fad diets and instead consume a variety of foods relatively low in calories but high in nutritional value. Source: Centers for Disease Control/CDC - Overweight and Obesity http://www.aap.org/advocacy/releases/obesity.htm • Weight loss requires consuming fewer calories than the body uses. Losing 1/2 pound of fat by dieting requires 10 days of consuming 200 fewer calories per day than the body uses. If 400 fewer calories are consumed than needed, a dieter can hope to lose 1/2 pound every 5 to 7 days. One pound of body fat stores about 3,500 calories. Source: Merck Manual Overview on Diets http://www.merck.com/mmhe/sec12/ch152/ch152g.html • Nutritional critics claim that low-carbohydrate diets lead to abnormal metabolic function that may lead to serious medical complications, particularly those with cardiovascular disease.Source: http://nutrition.ucdavis.edu/InfoSheets/lowcarb.htm • Nearly 43% of people currently using the Internet are searching for health and medical information for themselves or for someone they know.Source: http://www.bestdietforme.com/DietWebsites.htm • User beware -- most diet websites provide useful tools to select foods that best match your dietary needs but are sponsored by paid advertisers. For examples see: http://www.nutritiondata.com/ http://www.dietwatch.com Fast Food Facts • On any given day, one out of four Americans opts for a quick and cheap meal at a fast-food restaurant.Source: Fast Food Nation: The Dark Side of the All-American Meal By Eric Schlosser - Harper Perennial - January 2002 • A recent study with young adults found that among whites, but not blacks, eating fast food more than twice versus less than once per week was associated with 86% increased risk of becoming obese. Source: Pereira MA, Kartashov AI, Ebbeling CB, et al. Fast food consumption, obesity and risk of type 2 diabetes in young adults: the CARDIA Study [abstract]. Circulation. 2003 :107 • The frequency of visits to fast-food restaurants by children is associated with increased intake of soft drinks, cheeseburgers, pizza, French fries, total fat, and total calories and decreased intake of vegetables, fruit, and milk. Source: French SA, Story M, Neumark-Sztainer, Fulkerson JA, Hannan P. Fast food restaurant use among adolescents: associations with nutrient intake, food choices and behavioral and psychosocial variables. Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2001; 25 :1823 –1833 • A 2000 survey indicated that 95% of responding high school districts in California reported selling fast foods as a la carte items. Source: California High School Fast Food Survey - Public Health Institute Samuels & Associates – February 2000 http://www.californiaprojectlean.org/resourcelibrary/ • In 1999, the most common fast foods sold in districts as a la carte items were pizza (87%), cookies (86%), chips (84%), and burritos (83%). Source: California High School Fast Food Survey - Public Health Institute Samuels & Associates – February 2000 http://www.californiaprojectlean.org/resourcelibrary/ • A Burger King Double Whopper w/ Cheese , a Jack in the Box Bacon Ultimate Cheeseburger and Carl''s Jr. The Western Bacon Six Dollar Burger each top 1000 calories in one serving.Sources: http://www.fastfoodfacts.info/ see also http://www.fatcalories.com/links.cfm